Keynote

Keynote

Computing for well-being – What behavioural science says about sustainable behaviour change


Philip J. Corr
(Professor of Psychology and Behavioural Economics at City, University of London)

Abstract
Research shows that changing behaviour is easy, but sustaining such change is hard. Drawing on the fields of personality psychology and behavioural economics/science, I outline the challenges faced by interventions designed to enhance well-being. Personality matters and sustainable behaviour change means going with the flow of people’s characteristic ways of thinking, feeling and acting – the one-size-fits-all approach is not fit for purpose. Consistent with the personality approach is what we know from behavioural economics/science – for example, Nudge Theory, which is designed to enable people automatically to make better choices (e.g., in health-related behaviours) without affecting their freedom to choice (e.g., the liberty to decline the choice architect’s offerings). There is now a kit from which behavioural tools can be drawn to design and deliver effective interventions (e.g., UK government’s MINDSPACE approach), which I discuss. I conclude with some thoughts on the individualised preferences of real people: to sustain behaviour change, we must understand them, as seen from the perspective of the individual. Personalised adaptive technology is especially well-suited to delivering interventions tailored to these individualised preferences, serving to enhance well-being in ways that make most sense to the target audience.

Bio
Philip J. Corr is Professor of Psychology and Behavioural Economics at City, University of London, where he set-up the MSc in Behavioural Economics. Philip has published close to 200 academic papers and a number of authored and edited books in the fields of personality, individual differences, behavioural economics, and military role transition. Philip is the co-founding President of the Society for the Psychology of Individual Differences (BSPID; 2009-) and has been an elected President (2015-17) of the International Society for the Study of Individual Differences (ISSID). He is also The Founding Editor-in-Chief of Personality Neuroscience, a journal published by Cambridge University Press. More recently, Philip established Behavioural Fusion – a consultancy applying behavioural economics/science solutions to business problems.